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  Brolliar/Siesta/Sponseller Soil Types

A combination of Brolliar, Siesta, and Sponseller soil types are generally found within this area of the watershed. While the Brolliar soils are usually found at elevations ranging from 6,500 ft. (1,982 m) to 7,600 ft. (2,317 m), the Siesta soils generally range from 6,800 ft. (2,073 m) to 8,000 ft. (2,439 m) and the Sponseller soils generally are found at elevations of 7,800 ft. (2,378 m) or more. These three soil types are lumped into a single unit here to accommodate the scale of this map.

Brolliar: The Brolliar soils are generally moderately deep and deep, well-drained, noncalcareous soils that occur mainly on nearly level to hilly uplands where average annual precipitation is 20-23 inches. They are formed in material weathered from porous basalt. The plant cover in these soils consists chiefly of ponderosa pine, Gambel oak, Arizona fescue, mountain muhly, bluegrass, squirreltail, and junegrass. Brolliar soils have a dark brown surface layer that is soft when dry and has platy structure. The subsoil is reddish brown, hard when dry, and has blocky structure. Basalt bedrock is at a depth of 2 to 5 feet and 20 to 60 percent of the surface is covered in stones and cobblestones with a layer of undecomposed and partly decomposed pine needles overlying the mineral soil.

Siesta: The Siesta soils are generally moderately deep and deep, well-drained, noncalcareous soils on that occur mainly in gently rolling and undulating uplands where average annual precipitation is 20-22 inches. Their occurrence is mainly limited to the east side of the watershed. The plant cover consists of ponderosa pine, Gambel oak, Arizona fescue, junegrass, mountain muhly, blue grama, iris, lupine, and annual weeds. Siesta soils have a reddish brown surface layer that is soft when dry and has platy and granular structure. The subsoil is reddish brown, very hard when dry, and has blocky structure. The substratum is red, slightly hard when dry, and massive. Bedrock is at a depth of 36 to 60 inches and the soil contains small amounts of rounded gravel in most places.

Sponseller: Sponseller soils are generally deep and moderately deep, well-drained, noncalcareous soils on gently sloping to steep side slopes of cinder cones. They are formed in material weathered from volcanic cinders. Their occurrence is limited to the pine forests on the east side of the watershed, in the highest elevations where average annual precipitation is 22-24 inches. Plant cover consists of ponderosa pine, limber pine, Douglas fir, aspen, Gambel oak, New Mexican locust, Arizona fescue, junegrass, mountain muhly, and blue grama. Sponseller soils have a stony, dark reddish brown surface layer that is hard when dry and has platy or granular structure. The subsoil is reddish brown, is hard when dry, and has blocky structure. The substratum is gravelly and yellowish red, hard when dry, and massive. Volcanic cinders occur at a depth of 20 to 52 inches and a thick mat of needle litter overlies the mineral soil in most places. Sponseller soils tend to be sightly acidic to neutral.

Reference:

Williams, J.A.; Anderson, T.C., Jr. 1967. Soil Survey of Beaver Creek Area, Arizona. USDA Forest Service, Soil Conservation Service and Arizona Agriculture Experiment Station.

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Arizona University         Merriam-Powell Center for Environmental Research         Rocky Mountain Research Station         MAB