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Karro/Laveen/Guest/House Mountain/Penthouse Soil Types

A combination of Karro, Laveen, Guest, House Mountain, and Penthouse soils are present in this area of the watershed. They are lumped here as one unit because of their scattered occurrence within this portion of the map and their close associations with one another. While Karro soils are found at elevations ranging from 3,500 ft. (1,067m) to 4,000 ft. (1,220m) and Guest soils are typically at elevations ranging from 3,500 ft. (1,067m) to 3,900 ft. (1,189m), House Mountain soils are limited to elevations of about 3,700 ft. (1,128m), Penthouse soils are limited to elevations of about 3,800 ft. (1,159m), and Laveen soils are limited to elevations of about 3,900 ft. (1,189m).

Karro: Karro soils are deep, well-drained, and occur on alluvial fans and terraces. They formed in mixed alluvium derived from limestone, sandstone, and shale. The surface is usually barren and they occur in areas where the average annual precipitation is about 12 inches. Plant cover includes mesquite, canotia, creosotebush, yucca, algerita, sideoats grama, three-awn, and needle-and-thread. They are calcareous throughout and have a light brown, soft surface layer that is either massive or has a platy or subangular blocky structure. The subsoil and substratum are brown to pink, are hard or extremely hard, and are either massive or have blocky or platy structure.

Laveen: Laveen soils are deep, well-drained, very strongly calcareous fine sandy loams and gravelly sandy loams on alluvial fans and terraces. They formed in sediments derived from limestone and sandstone and occur in areas where average annual precipitation is about 13 inches. They have a pale brown to pink surface layer that is soft or very soft and has platy or subangular blocky structure. The subsoil and substratum are pink to white, soft, very strongly calcareous material thath has blocky structure or is massive. The substratum contains some lime concretions and some cemented layers. Plant cover includes scattered juniper trees, mesquite, yucca, cacti, canotia, snakeweed, and native grasses.

Guest: Guest soils are deep, well-drained, calcareous soils on alluvial fans and bottom lands. They formed in alluvium derived mainly from basalt and partly from limestone. They have a brown surface layer that is slightly hard when dry and has platy structure. The subsoil and substratum are brown and have blocky structure. The subsoil is hard or very hard, and the substratum is hard. Small pebbles of basalt occur on the surface in some places. They occur in areas where average annual precipitation is about 12 inches. Plant cover includes mesquite, catclaw, and tobosa. Some areas are nearly barren, but others have a dense stand of tobosa.

House Mountain: House Mountain soils are very shallow and shallow, well-drained soils on uplands. They formed in material weathered from basalt. They occur in areas where the average annual precipitation is about 12 inches. Plant cover is mainly mesquite, turbinella oak, sideoats grama, black grama, three-awn, fluffgrass, snakeweed, algerita, and juniper. More than half of the surface is barren. They have a brown color that is inherited from the parent basalt. The surface layer is soft when dry and has platy structure or is massive. It overlies a layer that is soft when dry and has blocky structure or is massive. Under this is brown soil material in cracks in very hard basalt. In places these soils are noncalcareous, and in other places they are strongly calcareous.

Penthouse: Penthouse soils are deep and well-drained. They occur on nearly level and gently sloping old high terraces and the lower parts of fans. They developed in material weathered from basalt and sandstone and occur in areas where the average annual precipitation is 13 inches. Plant cover is mainly mesquite, snakeweed, cacti, filaree, juniper, tobosa, and blue grama. Much of the surface is barren. These soils have a brown, soft surface layer that has platy structure. The subsoil is reddish brown, is hard or very hard, and has blocky structure. The substratum is pink, hard, massive, and strongly calcareous.

Reference:

Williams, J.A.; Anderson, T.C., Jr. 1967. Soil Survey of Beaver Creek Area, Arizona. USDA Forest Service, Soil Conservation Service and Arizona Agriculture Experiment Station.


					

                  
Northern Arizona University         Merriam-Powell Center for Environmental Research         Rocky Mountain Research Station         MAB